Wednesday, 3 July 2013

Do Loft Conversions require Planning Permission?

Question: Do Loft Conversions require Planning Permission?


 

Answer 1: No Planning Permission is Required - if the loft coversion only has roof window - VELUX Windows

Answer 2:
No Planning Permission is Required - if the loft coversion proposaln has REAR FACING dormer window(s) and/or Velux Windows, HOWEVER, this is only the case where Permitted Development Rights (PD Rights) are in place.



To be permitted development any additional roof space created by dormers must not exceed these volume allowances:
* 40 cubic metres for terraced houses.
* 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses.


If Permitted Development Rights have been removed - then a Planning Application WILL BE required.

You can check your PD Rights by contacting the Local Authority Planning Department.
Where work is proposed to a listed building, listed building consent may be required. The permitted development allowances described apply to houses not flats, maisonettes or other buildings.

Please note: In any event if the loft conversion is to be a habital space it is essential that a Building Regulation Application is submitted to Building Control with details of insulation, structural engineering and other technical requirements.



Answer 3: Planning Permission IS Required - If the loft conversion proposal has front facing dormer windows.

Velux Cabrio Windows are a great alternative to a front facing dormer window - and they don't require planning approval - if PD Right are in place on the property.


Further info can be found on the Planning Portal - Loft Conversions

OR check out the Planning Portal - Animated Guide

If you're unsure then please do not hesitate to get in touch - Thanks

Do Garage Conversions require Planning Permission?


Question: Do Garage Conversions require Planning Permission?

Answer: Planning Permission NOT required UNLESS the Permitted Development Rights have been removed - In this case Planning Permission WILL BE required.

You can check your PD Rights by contacting the Local Authority Planning Department.
Where work is proposed to a listed building, listed building consent may be required. The permitted development allowances described apply to houses not flats, maisonettes or other buildings.


Please note: In any event if the garage is to be a habital space it is essential that a Building Regulation Application is submitted to Building Control with details of insulation, floor build-up and other technical requirements.

See photo below of what can be achived when a garage space is converted...


Further info can be found on the Planning Portal

As previously stated, the conversion of a garage, or part of a garage, into habitable space will normally require approval under the Building Regulations.

Do I Need Planning Permission for a Conservatory?




Question: Do I Need Planning Permission for a Conservatory extension?

Quick answer: It depends on the proposed size, location within the site and the area you live - but they are NOT exempt from planning permission.

Firstly, if your Permitted Development Rights (PD Rights) have been removed then you WILL need Planning Permission no matter what.


You can check your PD Rights by contacting the Local Authority Planning Department.

Then, for a semi-detached property, if the conservatory or extension is single storey and at the rear of the property then you can develop up to a 3m projection OR 3m-6m with extended PD Right until 30th May 2016.

If located at the side of the property then if may be up to half the width of the existing/as built/original building.

It make no real difference to the planning process or PD Rights if the development is a Conservatory OR an extension.

IMPORTANT: Please make sure that a least 75% of the roof area is glazed and a minimum of 50% of the wall area is glazed otherwise Building Control will require an application, foundation and structural details, possible heat-loss/thermal calculations and this will also attract a Building Control inspection fee.

Further info can be found on the Planning Portal - Conservatory Guide

OR check out the Planning Portal - Animated Guide it's great!

If you're unsure then please do not hesitate to get in touch - Thanks

New Permitted Developement


I'm sure that you've heard the rumours about being able to build a domestic extension with a projection of up to 8m... Well, it's TRUE!!

The revision of the new permitted development right mean that from 30th May 2013 until 30th May 2016 single storey domestic extensions located at the rear of the property may be up to 6m (if the property is terrace or semi-detached) or 8m (if the property is detached).



Unfortunately you just can't go building anything 'willy-nilly' - there are a few restrictions:

1. Development must be drawn-up and architectural details submitted to the Local Authority (no fee other than site location plans)

2. The proposal will be subject to consultation - this means that your neighbours may object to the development.

The process, from the day of submission, should take approx. 42 days, however, approval is not guaranteed - so be careful to keep you grand designs realistic and in accordance with the PD Framework.

In addition to the above other conditions apply - information can be found on this Planning Guide for the larger home extensions.

As always, for further information please de not hesitate to contact me.

MSc Timber Engineering - Structural

I'm really looking forward to going back to school... smiley

I start my part-time MSc in Timber Engineering at Edinburgh Napier University this September - this is a structural engineering masters degree programme specialising in the design and structural engineering of timber buildings and structures.




Subjects to be studied include (Level 7):
Analysis & Timber Design 1
Project Management
Sustainable Building Design
Timber Materials Application
Analysis & Timber Design 2
Timber Form & Construction
Masters Dissertation Research Project



This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) with ICE & IStructE for candidates who have already acquired a Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Well, if your reading this and think 'That's sounds great!' then check out Edinburgh Napier University - you never know I might see you there!

Changes to the Party Wall Act




Recently it has been announced that there's amendments to the Party Wall Act...
The Party Wall Act provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to party walls, boundary walls and excavations near neighbouring buildings.

List_of_Changes

I normally provide clients with Party Wall Agreements to cover the following:


  • 1. new building on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • 2. work to an existing party wall or party structure
  • 3. excavation near to and below the foundation level of neighbouring buildings
This may include:
  • A. building a new wall on or at the boundary of 2 properties
  • B. cutting into a party wall
  • C. making a party wall taller, shorter or deeper
  • D. removing chimney breasts from a party wall
  • E. knocking down and rebuilding a party wall
  • F. digging below the foundation level of a neighbour’s property

Anyway, check out the Explanatory_Booklet_PDF or just contact me for some free informal advice... I'll be happy to help smiley

What is it? - Party Wall

The Party Wall is normally a dividing wall or fence that is constructed on the boundary line generally between 2 properties. To work on the Party Wall for maintenance or say installing steelwork for a domestic loft conversion you WILL NEED to issue notice and gain approval from your neighbours prior to doing anything! Normally the notice period in 30 days.

 

A building owner proposing to start work covered by the Act must give adjoining owners notice of their intentions in the way set down in the Act. Adjoining owners can agree or disagree with what is proposed. Where they disagree, the Act provides a mechanism for resolving disputes.

The Party Wall Act is separate from obtaining planning permission or building regulations approval.